From the Brooklyn Museum

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#Repost @brooklynmuseum ・・・ The photographs #WendyRedStar uses in her Crow Peace Delegation series were originally taken by Charles Milton Bell in 1880 when a Crow delegation of six chiefs traveled to Washington D.C. to negotiate the expansion of the Northern Pacific Railroad. Bell is often criticized for not identifying the sitter or even the nation his subjects came from. In the series, Red Star enlivens the figures with red ink annotations which provide more in-depth information about the person's history and the significance of their regalia, educating nonindigenous viewers while also commenting on white Americans’ ignorance of Native American culture. #halfthepicturebkm ⠀ Wendy Red Star (Apsáalooke (Crow), born Billings, Montana, 1981). Peelatchiwaaxpáash / Medicine Crow (Raven), 2014, from the series 1880 Crow Peace Delegation. Pigment print on paper, from digitally reproduced and artist-manipulated photograph by C.M. (Charles Milton) Bell, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution. #BrooklynMuseum; Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art, Gift of Loren G. Lipson, M.D., TL2018.8.1a–b. © Wendy Red Star. #bkmfeministart⠀#nativeamericanhistory #indigenoushistory #indigenousvoices #ushistory #americanhistory

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The caption reads:

#Repost @brooklynmuseum
・・・
The photographs #WendyRedStar uses in her Crow Peace Delegation series were originally taken by Charles Milton Bell in 1880 when a Crow delegation of six chiefs traveled to Washington D.C. to negotiate the expansion of the Northern Pacific Railroad. Bell is often criticized for not identifying the sitter or even the nation his subjects came from. In the series, Red Star enlivens the figures with red ink annotations which provide more in-depth information about the person’s history and the significance of their regalia, educating nonindigenous viewers while also commenting on white Americans’ ignorance of Native American culture. #halfthepicturebkm

Wendy Red Star (Apsáalooke (Crow), born Billings, Montana, 1981). Peelatchiwaaxpáash / Medicine Crow (Raven), 2014, from the series 1880 Crow Peace Delegation. Pigment print on paper, from digitally reproduced and artist-manipulated photograph by C.M. (Charles Milton) Bell, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution. #BrooklynMuseum; Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art, Gift of Loren G. Lipson, M.D., TL2018.8.1a–b. © Wendy Red Star. #bkmfeministart#nativeamericanhistory #indigenoushistory #indigenousvoices #ushistory #americanhistory

Food for Thought Friday: Historical Empathy

puritan, native american, puck

On a recent visit to Ellis Island, Marabou came across this cartoon. The March 30, 1898 (Vol. 43, No. 1099) cover of Puck magazine shows a Native American man, wearing a war bonnet and deerskin pants, holding up and gesturing to a rolled document that reads “An act to prevent the country from being overrun by foreigners.” A blonde white man in Puritan dress (who, according to the Library of Congress is supposed to be Senator Henry Cabot Lodge) cowers on his knees with hands clasped, fearfully looking upward. A tag reading “A.D. 1620” hangs out of his pocket referring to the English establishment of Plymouth Colony in present-day Massachusetts. The illustration’s caption muses, “Where would WE [bolded and underscored] be?… If the real Americans had held Lodge’s view on immigration there would be no Lodge Bill now – nor anything else.” The reader is asked to consider immigration policy through an historic lens. Food for Thought Friday: Historical Empathy

Go Out and Vote!

For Marabou’s friends in the United States, remember, your vote counts. This Midterm Election we can take action and start momentum toward positive change. We must take advantage of every opportunity available to voice what is no longer acceptable and offer alternatives for the social, economic, and political advancement for those who have been ignored and neglected. Voting is one action among many to follow.

Not sure where to vote? Find your polling location here.