In the News: Museums Respond to Requests for Object Repatriation

Last week Marabou posted about colonial language shaping the way people understand African history and culture at the British Museum. Last Friday, coordinated actions by Decolonize This Place at The Brooklyn Museum and at the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD) asked for accountability and repatriation of African objects. As people demand museums acknowledge and rectify historical transgressions, how are institutions responding? In the News: Museums Respond to Requests for Object Repatriation

From Decolonize This Place

The images says:

So called diversity and inclusion reinforces whiteness by making aesthetic changes…

This is why we act to decenter whiteness.

It’s not about skin color per se, it’s about power. #decolonizethisplace

From Decolonize This Place

From the Brooklyn Museum

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#Repost @brooklynmuseum ・・・ The photographs #WendyRedStar uses in her Crow Peace Delegation series were originally taken by Charles Milton Bell in 1880 when a Crow delegation of six chiefs traveled to Washington D.C. to negotiate the expansion of the Northern Pacific Railroad. Bell is often criticized for not identifying the sitter or even the nation his subjects came from. In the series, Red Star enlivens the figures with red ink annotations which provide more in-depth information about the person's history and the significance of their regalia, educating nonindigenous viewers while also commenting on white Americans’ ignorance of Native American culture. #halfthepicturebkm ⠀ Wendy Red Star (Apsáalooke (Crow), born Billings, Montana, 1981). Peelatchiwaaxpáash / Medicine Crow (Raven), 2014, from the series 1880 Crow Peace Delegation. Pigment print on paper, from digitally reproduced and artist-manipulated photograph by C.M. (Charles Milton) Bell, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution. #BrooklynMuseum; Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art, Gift of Loren G. Lipson, M.D., TL2018.8.1a–b. © Wendy Red Star. #bkmfeministart⠀#nativeamericanhistory #indigenoushistory #indigenousvoices #ushistory #americanhistory

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The caption reads:

#Repost @brooklynmuseum
・・・
The photographs #WendyRedStar uses in her Crow Peace Delegation series were originally taken by Charles Milton Bell in 1880 when a Crow delegation of six chiefs traveled to Washington D.C. to negotiate the expansion of the Northern Pacific Railroad. Bell is often criticized for not identifying the sitter or even the nation his subjects came from. In the series, Red Star enlivens the figures with red ink annotations which provide more in-depth information about the person’s history and the significance of their regalia, educating nonindigenous viewers while also commenting on white Americans’ ignorance of Native American culture. #halfthepicturebkm

Wendy Red Star (Apsáalooke (Crow), born Billings, Montana, 1981). Peelatchiwaaxpáash / Medicine Crow (Raven), 2014, from the series 1880 Crow Peace Delegation. Pigment print on paper, from digitally reproduced and artist-manipulated photograph by C.M. (Charles Milton) Bell, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution. #BrooklynMuseum; Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art, Gift of Loren G. Lipson, M.D., TL2018.8.1a–b. © Wendy Red Star. #bkmfeministart#nativeamericanhistory #indigenoushistory #indigenousvoices #ushistory #americanhistory